Eye Surgery

Eye Surgery
Cataract Surgery
A cataract is a cloudy area in the lens in the front of the eye. There is no pain associated with the condition but there are other symptoms, including:
• Blurred/hazy vision
• Spots in front of the eye(s)
• Sensitivity to glare
• A feeling of “film” over the eye(s)
Most people develop cataracts simply as a result of aging, with the majority of cases occurring in people over the age of 55. Other risk factors include eye injury or disease, a family history of cataracts, smoking or use of certain medications.
For people who are significantly affected by cataracts, lens replacement surgery may be recommended. During cataract surgery, a small ultrasonic probe is inserted into the eye, which breaks up, or emulsifies, the cloudy lens into tiny pieces and gently sucks, or aspirates, those pieces out of the eye. Phaco surgery requires a small incision of only 3.2 mm or less. To make your procedure as painless as possible, anesthesia is a combination of local and/or topical along with IV sedation.
With the recent advance of foldable IOLs, artificial lenses can be implanted through the same small incision that is created in the phaco procedure. These IOLs are made of a flexible material, allowing them to be folded for implantation. Once inside the eye, the lens unfolds and returns to its original shape.

Blepharoplasty
By removing excess fat, skin and muscle from the upper and lower eyelids, blepharoplasty can rejuvenate puffy, sagging or tired-looking eyes.  It is typically a cosmetic procedure but can also improve vision by lifting droopy eyelids out of the patient’s field of vision. 
The procedure is usually performed in an office with local anesthesia and lasts 45 minutes to a few hours depending on how much work is done.  Incisions are made along the eyelids in inconspicuous places (in the creases of the upper lids, and just below the lashes on the lower lids).  The surgeon removes excess tissue through these incisions and then stitches them closed with fine sutures.  In the case that no skin needs to be removed, the surgeon will likely perform a transconjunctival blepharoplasty, where the incision is made inside the lower eyelid and there are no visible scars.